Tag Archives: Sangre de Cristo

Nature, Sage to Meadow, and my novel

Hopi-tended corn plants. Photo relayed by Kiara Shanice, FB post, 2020

To all my Sage to Meadow followers! I am pleased to announce to you the Jack Matthews, PhD, Author Page for my novels.

So much of my blogging on Sage to Meadow–in fact, nearly all of it–concerns humanity’s relationship to nature on a concrete level: grasses, birds, water, sky, trees, flowers.

I continue those themes on my Author Page.

As I have written in My About page on Sage to Meadow, “What I seek to accomplish in Sage to Meadow blog is to write about nature, wild and domesticated living things, people that live with the land and the constant cycles of the seasons that envelop our lives.” In novelistic form, I will continue working with those themes. For example, here is a quote from Death at La Osa, my first novel of the River Who Knows? cycle.

“Quail Looks Away set her pails down and attended the words as best she could understand.  A sudden wind blew dust across the plaza and stirred the cottonwood trees along the river, the leaves rattling softly when green and luscious and filled with moisture.  Yellowed leaves fell with the wind.  Soon all cottonwood leaves would turn yellow, falling in the stream and collecting along the banks.  Quail would swish away the leaves with her hand to get un-leaved water for her kitchen.  Rio Tulona was also called Rio Cottonwood, for along its banks, leaves carpeted the ground.”

I think you can see how I have carried the themes of Sage to Meadow over to my Author Page.

Please take a moment and visit my Author Page and look at Chapter 1 of the novel, Death at La Osa, set in northern New Mexico with its desert mesas and high country of the Sangre de Cristos and Tusas Mountains. Sign up for the Author Page and get new posts and the news.

Best wishes,

Jack

Rio Pueblo at Palo Flechado Campground. Photo by Jack Matthews, 2013.

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Truchas Peaks, New Mexico

 

Truchas Peaks near Mora Pass

Looking westward toward the Truchas Peaks, New Mexico, November 2017.

I have been traveling to Taos, New Mexico, several times in the past year.  I stop at this spot near Mora Pass that is up in altitude from Sipapu Lodge in order to look back at the mountains before I head down the Mora Pass to Holman, Cleveland, Mora, and Las Vegas.  The valley you see in the foreground is the starting valley and surrounds for Rio Pueblo that flows eventually into the Rio Grande near Embudo.

I have climbed two of the three Truchas Peaks, encountering Bighorn sheep on the trail to the summit.  I was in my twenties when I climbed; now I am seventy-five years old and I stop and look back on the mountains and my life, the near and the faraway.

Lately, within the last few weeks, I have seen near my home in Fort Worth the most beautiful coyote poised and stationary alongside the Chisholm Trail Tollway, its coat shiny and tail bushy and full.  In my frontyard, two racoons ambled by and climbed into the trees.  A bluejay in the neighborhood warns others of my approach as I walkabout.  At my Far Field near Mingus, Texas (the source of most of my posts on this blog), I have heard the Sandhill Cranes in the sky, but failed to see them catch the thermals.  But, I hear them.  I see the turned soil of wild hogs in my field, the voles that run away from my tractor when I shred mesquite.  When I was in Lubbock at Thanksgiving I heard and saw flocks of Canadian geese in the air and along the playas of the region.

Magpies fly across the backyard of my daughter’s home in Taos.

I am looking and I see the wild on this earth.  I am having a conversation with the wild.  And, I listen so attentively and look so closely that I am beginning to grieve as I never had before.

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Filed under Adventure, Life in Balance, Life Out of Balance, Nature Writing Series, Sandhill Crane

Taos Sunflower: When The Simple Life Isn’t

A really great post on being on and off and on the electrical grid in Taos, New Mexico.  Personal comments on solar panels, batteries, washing, refrigeration and a husband who happens to be an electrical engineer.

Martie (Taos Sunflower) evokes the contradictions we all live with in trying to be frugal, green and sustainable.

Taos Sunflower: When the simple life isn’t.

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